Features and specs

2-Way

The 2-way speaker features two different drivers that share reproduction of the entire frequency range – one mid-woofer (in the case of center speakers, often two of them) and a tweeter. Usually the crossover frequency is set between 2,000Hz and 3,000Hz.

2 ½-Way

The 2 ½-way speaker operates similar to a 2-way speaker, but is supplemented by an additional woofer, which covers the frequency range up to 500Hz in parallel to the mid-woofer.

3-Way

The 3-way speaker features three different drivers that share reproduction of the entire frequency range. One or more woofers, a midrange driver and a tweeter. Usually the crossover frequency between low and mid frequencies is set between 150Hz and 300Hz, and between 2,000Hz and 3,000Hz for the transition from the midrange to the tweeter.

3 ½-Way

The 3 ½-way speaker is conceived like a 3-way speaker, but is supplemented by an additional mid-woofer, which covers the frequency range up to 500Hz in parallel to the midrange.

4-Way

The 4-way speaker features four different drivers that share reproduction of the entire frequency range. One or more subwoofers, one or more woofers, a midrange and a tweeter. Usually the crossover frequency between subwoofer and woofer is set at around 100Hz, while low and mid frequencies are separated between 250Hz and 400Hz, and the crossover frequency between midrange and tweeter is normally set at 2,000Hz to 3,000Hz.

Push Push

The 3-way and 3 ½-way speaker models in the Audio Physic portfolio feature laterally mounted woofers. This allows for a narrow baffle design even if large woofer diameters are used, and thus offering the outstanding spatial imaging typical of our loudspeakers. In contrast to the currently very popular variants with only one side-mounted woofer, we at Audio Physic prefer a bilateral arrangement instead. The speaker’s drivers work in phase (whereby all woofer diaphragms move either inward or outward). The forces in this so-called “push-push” setup acting on the enclosure therefore cancel almost each other out, thus resulting in a precise, low-resonance sound. However, this “push-push” arrangement is not to be confused with the push-pull principle used in amplifier design.

Active Cone Damping

Active Cone Damping Active Cone Damping (ACD) is a form of resonance suppression of metal
diaphragms realized for the first time by Audio Physic. A silicone rubber ring attached round the edge of the diaphragm causes a targeted preload of the diaphragm. This is a highly effective means to eliminate the otherwise unavoidable ringing of the diaphragm - the metallic sound character
disappears.

VCT – Vibration Control Terminal

Unwanted resonances disturb the unadulterated flow of music signals anywhere in the audio chain. High-quality and robust equipment stands as well as special component feet and bases often significantly enhance the sound quality of the system. However, a particular pathway for mechanical disturbances remains unconsidered. The cables required for signal transmission not only transport electrical signals but, unfortunately, also mechanical energy and, most importantly, opposite to the direction of the signal. Therefore mechanical vibrations measureable at the speaker’s enclosure can be traced up to the signal source.

Audio Physic's Vibration Control Terminal eliminates these unwanted disturbances. The solid, additionally damped aluminum plate, flexibly mounted on a neoprene gasket, ensures effective decoupling of the terminal connectors from the enclosure.

Single-Wiring / Bi-Wiring / Bi-Amping

Audio Physic loudspeakers are being now delivered as standard with just one pair of high-quality terminal connectors (single-wiring). Experience has shown that only few of our customers used to operate their speakers in bi-wiring or bi-amping mode, but never wanted to accept the sonic disadvantages of the then inevitable metal or cable bridges. Almost all our speaker models are internally designed for bi-wiring / bi-amping – upon request, newly ordered speakers can be equipped with this option. Subsequent retrofitting though is not possible.

Burning-in

Burning-in All brand-new speakers require a certain break-in time until they reach their optimum sound quality. This amounts to approx. 20-50 hours depending on the model and the chosen form of the burning-in process. Even after this time span, however, changes are still noticeable - sometimes even years later. Particularly critical components are already burnt-in at Audio Physic prior to assembly in order to shorten the break-in time. There exist different opinios about the correct burning-in process as well as the required duration. Good results can be achieved with either special burn-in CDs, music or interstational noise from the FM tuner.